FAQs2018-07-05T21:53:20+00:00

Frequently Asked Questions

What is snickerdoodle?2018-06-25T21:26:10+00:00

snickerdoodle is a prototype-to-production platform for building high-integrity IoT products. A business-card-sized embedded computer, snickerdoodle combines programmable logic, ARM, and wireless connectivity.

You can learn more about snickerdoodle here.

Do I need to download anything to get started?2018-06-25T20:42:47+00:00

You’ll need to download some Xilinx development tools before getting started.

Access the Xilinx Download Center and download/install “Vivado HLx WebPACK” (license free) with Xilinx SDK.

There are some basic instructions on how to install the tools on our Tutorials page.

Is the development software free?2018-06-25T21:26:28+00:00

Yes! See the previous question for more details.

What if I want to use snickerdoodle in a commercial product?2018-06-25T21:26:33+00:00

Great! snickerdoodle is intended to be a prototype-to-production platform and we can support anything from one-offs to tens of thousands of units annually.

If you need pricing, delivery, and other details for a volume application, please complete our online sales form and someone will be in touch.

How do I design my own snickerdoodle baseboard?2018-06-25T21:27:15+00:00

Please consult our Documentation page for snickerdoodle footprint drawings and pinout tables.

You can find additional resources on our GitHub page.

What is snickerdoodle’s temperature range? And do you offer an industrial version?2018-06-25T22:38:26+00:00

Below is a list of snickerdoodle component temperature ranges:

667MHz Zynq 7010 (XC7Z010-CLG400C): 0C to 85C
866MHz Zynq 7020 (XC7Z020-CLG400E): 0C to 100C

Single-Band WL1801 Radio (WL1801MODGBMOCx): -20C to 70C
Dual-Band 2×2 MIMO WL1837 Radio (WL1837MODGIMOCx): -40C to 85C

LPDDR2 Memory: -30C to 85C

STM32: -40C to 85C

Flash and Crypto EEPROM: -40C to 85C

“Everything else”: -30C to 85C ‘or better’

Note: we do have “industrial” snickerdoodle versions available. If you have an application requiring extended temperature ranges, please let us know.

I need a custom snickerdoodle configuration, can you help?2018-06-25T21:27:10+00:00

If none of our “standard” snickerdoodle configurations meet your application requirements, we may still be able to help.

Please use our online web form to provide us with the details and we’ll let you know what can be done.

Note: depending on the specific requirements, non-recurring engineering fees, minimum orders, and other stipulations may apply.

How big is snickerdoodle and how much does it weigh?2018-06-25T21:26:43+00:00

snickerdoodle is the size of a standard US business card: 2.0″ x 3.5″ (50.8mm x 88.9mm) – more detailed dimensions can be found here.

Here are some typical weights (+/-0.1g):

snickerdoodle (Zynq-7010), connectors up: 32.6g
snickerdoodle (Zynq-7010), connectors down: 31.0g
snickerdoodle black (Zynq-7020), connectors up: 33.2g
snickerdoodle black (Zynq-7020), connectors down: 31.8g
copperHead heatsink: 9.4g
32GB microSD card: 0.3g

And the baseboards:

breakyBreaky v3.0: 71.3g
adhesive-base locking PCB support (four are provided with breakyBreaky): 0.6g

Do I have to run Linux?2018-06-25T22:38:40+00:00

No. With two “hard” ARM Cortex-A9 processor cores inside the Zynq SoC, snickerdoodle supports a wide range of real-time and general-purpose operating systems. Alternatively, if the overhead and functionality of a full-blown OS in not necessary, it’s also possible to run snickerdoodle “bare metal.”

How do I access JTAG?2018-07-10T18:48:52+00:00

All the JTAG pins are available on J2. These are most easily accessible on a) a “connectors down” board plugged into a snickerdoodle baseboard containing the standard JTAG header (e.g. breakyBreaky, piSmasher) or b) a “connectors up” board.

Note: the “official” Xilinx JTAG-USB adaptor can be found here. Alternatively, some people have had luck with the JTAG-HS3 from Digilent.

What is the voltage range for snickerdoodle’s I/O pins?2018-06-25T22:35:35+00:00

The voltage levels for the FPGA I/O pins (JA1, JA2, JB1, JB2, JC1) are settable to between 1.2V and 3.3V.

snickerdoodle one has two independent “banks” of 50 FPGA I/O pins (JAx and JBx); each can be set to any I/O voltage in the aforementioned range. snickerdoodle black adds a third independent FPGA I/O bank of 25 I/O pins (JC1).

A 3.3V power supply output is supplied on each FPGA I/O connector, which can be used with a single jumper to set the I/O voltage to 3.3V for that bank without any additional external components. However, to use an I/O voltage other than 3.3V (1.2V to < 3.3V), that voltage must be supplied to the I/O bank. The microprocessor I/O (J3) have a fixed voltage of 1.8V. Note: this is required to support Ethernet on the baseboards, as RGMII does not support I/O voltages above 2.5V. The analog, audio, JTAG etc. I/O on J2 all have a fixed I/O voltage of 3.3V.

I’m having issues getting outputs on the I/O – what am I doing wrong?2018-06-25T21:32:16+00:00

Assuming everything else is “right,” the most likely cause is that no reference voltage is being applied to Pin 3. To output +3.3V, simply jumper Pin 1 to Pin 3 on the desired I/O bank.

What is the maximum data rate of snickerdoodle’s I/O?2018-06-25T21:51:11+00:00

snickerdoodle’s Zynq LVDS SerDes capabilities extend to 950 Mbps @ 475MHz DDR and 1250Mbps @ 625MHz DDR for snickerdoodle one and snickerdoodle black, respectively.

snickerdoodle’s Samtec TFM/SFM 1.27mm pitch connectors support gigabit signaling.

Is there a version of snickerdoodle without Wi-Fi & Bluetooth? Or can I disable the wireless?2018-06-25T22:48:00+00:00

We do not currently offer a version of snickerdoodle without wireless connectivity. However, the snickerdoodle radio can be “hardware disabled” by removing two zero-ohm resistors: R1 and R2 (see Page 5 of the snickerdoodle schematic).

If you have a volume commercial application that does not require or permit wireless, please submit an inquiry and we will be happy to discuss.

Does snickerdoodle have any differential pairs?2018-06-25T21:41:32+00:00

Each of the four (snickerdoodle one) or five (snickerdoodle black) FPGA connectors has 12x 100ohm differential pairs routed out in length-matched groups of six.

See pages 31-33 of the snickerdoodle schematics.

Note: A 2.5V VCCO_xx supply will need to be provided to the I/O banks where the LVDS I/O standard is to be used (LVDS_25 I/O attribute setting).

How do I implement CAN in my snickerdoodle application?2018-06-25T21:50:52+00:00

snickerdoodle’s Zynq SoC includes an integrated CAN controller. In order to use the standard differential CAN physical interface, it will be necessary to attach the controller pins (mapped on either J3 or the FPGA) to a CAN PHY with the desired features.

There are quite a few special features available on CAN PHYs depending on the application…

MAX3051 is a simple CAN PHY worth considering.

I ordered a snickerdoodle black – how do I access my free SDSoC license?2018-06-25T21:26:38+00:00

Simply email us with your snickerdoodle black serial number and we’ll provide you with a unique SDSoC Voucher Code.

Where does the name “snickerdoodle” come from?2018-06-25T21:27:34+00:00

While brainstorming names, we knew the product that would eventually come to be named “snickerdoodle” was going to be the first in a long line of embedded development platforms from krtkl. The goal was to find a name that was not only memorable, but one that embodied a warmth and friendliness representative of the level of usability and accessibility we were striving for with the product…something that’s rare in this hardware category.

We eventually landed on “cookies” and – after much discussion and deliberation – decided snickerdoodle would be a great place to start. The rest, as they say, is history.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is snickerdoodle?2018-06-25T21:26:10+00:00

snickerdoodle is a prototype-to-production platform for building high-integrity IoT products. A business-card-sized embedded computer, snickerdoodle combines programmable logic, ARM, and wireless connectivity.

You can learn more about snickerdoodle here.

Do I need to download anything to get started?2018-06-25T20:42:47+00:00

You’ll need to download some Xilinx development tools before getting started.

Access the Xilinx Download Center and download/install “Vivado HLx WebPACK” (license free) with Xilinx SDK.

There are some basic instructions on how to install the tools on our Tutorials page.

Is the development software free?2018-06-25T21:26:28+00:00

Yes! See the previous question for more details.

What if I want to use snickerdoodle in a commercial product?2018-06-25T21:26:33+00:00

Great! snickerdoodle is intended to be a prototype-to-production platform and we can support anything from one-offs to tens of thousands of units annually.

If you need pricing, delivery, and other details for a volume application, please complete our online sales form and someone will be in touch.

How do I design my own snickerdoodle baseboard?2018-06-25T21:27:15+00:00

Please consult our Documentation page for snickerdoodle footprint drawings and pinout tables.

You can find additional resources on our GitHub page.

What is snickerdoodle’s temperature range? And do you offer an industrial version?2018-06-25T22:38:26+00:00

Below is a list of snickerdoodle component temperature ranges:

667MHz Zynq 7010 (XC7Z010-CLG400C): 0C to 85C
866MHz Zynq 7020 (XC7Z020-CLG400E): 0C to 100C

Single-Band WL1801 Radio (WL1801MODGBMOCx): -20C to 70C
Dual-Band 2×2 MIMO WL1837 Radio (WL1837MODGIMOCx): -40C to 85C

LPDDR2 Memory: -30C to 85C

STM32: -40C to 85C

Flash and Crypto EEPROM: -40C to 85C

“Everything else”: -30C to 85C ‘or better’

Note: we do have “industrial” snickerdoodle versions available. If you have an application requiring extended temperature ranges, please let us know.

I need a custom snickerdoodle configuration, can you help?2018-06-25T21:27:10+00:00

If none of our “standard” snickerdoodle configurations meet your application requirements, we may still be able to help.

Please use our online web form to provide us with the details and we’ll let you know what can be done.

Note: depending on the specific requirements, non-recurring engineering fees, minimum orders, and other stipulations may apply.

How big is snickerdoodle and how much does it weigh?2018-06-25T21:26:43+00:00

snickerdoodle is the size of a standard US business card: 2.0″ x 3.5″ (50.8mm x 88.9mm) – more detailed dimensions can be found here.

Here are some typical weights (+/-0.1g):

snickerdoodle (Zynq-7010), connectors up: 32.6g
snickerdoodle (Zynq-7010), connectors down: 31.0g
snickerdoodle black (Zynq-7020), connectors up: 33.2g
snickerdoodle black (Zynq-7020), connectors down: 31.8g
copperHead heatsink: 9.4g
32GB microSD card: 0.3g

And the baseboards:

breakyBreaky v3.0: 71.3g
adhesive-base locking PCB support (four are provided with breakyBreaky): 0.6g

Do I have to run Linux?2018-06-25T22:38:40+00:00

No. With two “hard” ARM Cortex-A9 processor cores inside the Zynq SoC, snickerdoodle supports a wide range of real-time and general-purpose operating systems. Alternatively, if the overhead and functionality of a full-blown OS in not necessary, it’s also possible to run snickerdoodle “bare metal.”

How do I access JTAG?2018-07-10T18:48:52+00:00

All the JTAG pins are available on J2. These are most easily accessible on a) a “connectors down” board plugged into a snickerdoodle baseboard containing the standard JTAG header (e.g. breakyBreaky, piSmasher) or b) a “connectors up” board.

Note: the “official” Xilinx JTAG-USB adaptor can be found here. Alternatively, some people have had luck with the JTAG-HS3 from Digilent.

What is the voltage range for snickerdoodle’s I/O pins?2018-06-25T22:35:35+00:00

The voltage levels for the FPGA I/O pins (JA1, JA2, JB1, JB2, JC1) are settable to between 1.2V and 3.3V.

snickerdoodle one has two independent “banks” of 50 FPGA I/O pins (JAx and JBx); each can be set to any I/O voltage in the aforementioned range. snickerdoodle black adds a third independent FPGA I/O bank of 25 I/O pins (JC1).

A 3.3V power supply output is supplied on each FPGA I/O connector, which can be used with a single jumper to set the I/O voltage to 3.3V for that bank without any additional external components. However, to use an I/O voltage other than 3.3V (1.2V to < 3.3V), that voltage must be supplied to the I/O bank. The microprocessor I/O (J3) have a fixed voltage of 1.8V. Note: this is required to support Ethernet on the baseboards, as RGMII does not support I/O voltages above 2.5V. The analog, audio, JTAG etc. I/O on J2 all have a fixed I/O voltage of 3.3V.

I’m having issues getting outputs on the I/O – what am I doing wrong?2018-06-25T21:32:16+00:00

Assuming everything else is “right,” the most likely cause is that no reference voltage is being applied to Pin 3. To output +3.3V, simply jumper Pin 1 to Pin 3 on the desired I/O bank.

What is the maximum data rate of snickerdoodle’s I/O?2018-06-25T21:51:11+00:00

snickerdoodle’s Zynq LVDS SerDes capabilities extend to 950 Mbps @ 475MHz DDR and 1250Mbps @ 625MHz DDR for snickerdoodle one and snickerdoodle black, respectively.

snickerdoodle’s Samtec TFM/SFM 1.27mm pitch connectors support gigabit signaling.

Is there a version of snickerdoodle without Wi-Fi & Bluetooth? Or can I disable the wireless?2018-06-25T22:48:00+00:00

We do not currently offer a version of snickerdoodle without wireless connectivity. However, the snickerdoodle radio can be “hardware disabled” by removing two zero-ohm resistors: R1 and R2 (see Page 5 of the snickerdoodle schematic).

If you have a volume commercial application that does not require or permit wireless, please submit an inquiry and we will be happy to discuss.

Does snickerdoodle have any differential pairs?2018-06-25T21:41:32+00:00

Each of the four (snickerdoodle one) or five (snickerdoodle black) FPGA connectors has 12x 100ohm differential pairs routed out in length-matched groups of six.

See pages 31-33 of the snickerdoodle schematics.

Note: A 2.5V VCCO_xx supply will need to be provided to the I/O banks where the LVDS I/O standard is to be used (LVDS_25 I/O attribute setting).

How do I implement CAN in my snickerdoodle application?2018-06-25T21:50:52+00:00

snickerdoodle’s Zynq SoC includes an integrated CAN controller. In order to use the standard differential CAN physical interface, it will be necessary to attach the controller pins (mapped on either J3 or the FPGA) to a CAN PHY with the desired features.

There are quite a few special features available on CAN PHYs depending on the application…

MAX3051 is a simple CAN PHY worth considering.

I ordered a snickerdoodle black – how do I access my free SDSoC license?2018-06-25T21:26:38+00:00

Simply email us with your snickerdoodle black serial number and we’ll provide you with a unique SDSoC Voucher Code.

Where does the name “snickerdoodle” come from?2018-06-25T21:27:34+00:00

While brainstorming names, we knew the product that would eventually come to be named “snickerdoodle” was going to be the first in a long line of embedded development platforms from krtkl. The goal was to find a name that was not only memorable, but one that embodied a warmth and friendliness representative of the level of usability and accessibility we were striving for with the product…something that’s rare in this hardware category.

We eventually landed on “cookies” and – after much discussion and deliberation – decided snickerdoodle would be a great place to start. The rest, as they say, is history.